Romance Weekly

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

 

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Welcome to Kim Town, my corner of the Romance Weekly blog hop. Where 20+ fabulous romance authors answer questions about what it’s like to write.Thanks to the fascinating Veronica Forand, author of Tackled By the Girl Next Door, for the intro and to Fiona Riplee, author of The Sixxers, for this week’s fun questions.

 

Does humor help or hinder you in your creative process?

Absolutely helps. Doesn’t humor help everyone, through everything? That being said, what I think is funny is not always appropriate. (Just ask my gym buddies) I love corn. (My husband has the corniest sense of humor and I just love it.) But this doesn’t always fit with my characters. In my twenties, I hung out with several comedians – including the fabulous Miss Carla Collins, (whom my daughter peed on —’nother story) pictured here—even took a nerve shattering stab at stand-up myself once. I find situational comedy relatively easy to write. Humorous internalizations are more difficult. The gems are those one line zingers that seem to effortlessly fall from the hero’s or heroine’s mouths that take so long to come up with.

 

What is a favorite go-to book or movie you use to unblock a problem in your writing?

 

Legally Blonde, MGM

Legally Blonde, MGM

This may sound really dumb, because it’s not strictly a romance and Blake Snyder call it an example of the “Fool Triumphant”, but I love to watch Legally Blonde. Something about a girl who grows and wins, who drops the loser and picks up the dreamboat, and doesn’t have to change her core beliefs and or her fluffy feminine penchant for pink and feather boas. I just find that so inspiring. Elle Woods is my favorite character study. My favorite romance movie for plot derived from character study is The Princess Bride. I LOVE William Goldman. Before Snyder, before Vogler, before Truby, before Robert Keyes, I read Goldman’s Adventures in the Screen Trade. His treatise on character derived plot still enthralls.

 

What’s the most inspiring book you’ve read this week or month that’s generated a new idea?

Unknown-1There’s two. In the non-fiction category it’s Kristen Lamb’s Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World. I’ve spiffing up my blog site and adding new weekly features. And I credit that to Kristen’s advice. If you haven’t read her book, or heard of her, check her out. ❤ She’s awesome: http://authorkristenlamb.com/ In the fiction category, I’m going to have to say it’s friend Sarah Hegger’s forthcoming medieval Fairest Faye. I really ‘got’ her main character (and love her hero) and it helped me decide on a plot direction for the Victorian paranormal I’ve outlined. That being, fixing the B-story with strong elements of the emerging feminist movement of the 1880’s. Bang up to the elephant, wot?

 

Fun questions! Thanks for stopping by. Keep hopping. Next on the tour is my good friend Vicki Mixon, writer of romantic suspense.

http://vickimixon.com

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Hey! Romance Weekly is 6 months old today. Happy birthday to us. Were celebrating all day on our facebook page and starting today we’re taking our weekly author blog hop in a new direction. It’s fun. It’s entertaining. It’s open. And you’re invited to hop along!

 

from SoulMate Publishing

from SoulMate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

 

Thanks to Sarah Hegger, darling author of wonderful medieval The Bride Gift for the introduction.

This week’s theme is from Jo Richardson, author of Cursed be the Wicked.

 

 

My Top 10 Romances of All Time

 

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

1. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

Because she refuses to be less than she is and he loves her for it.

 

2. Natural Born Charmer – Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Because she’s prickly and desperate and he falls for her purple lollipop eyes.

 

3. Faking It – Jennifer Crusie

Because he’s a con artist and she’s an art forger. (Need I say more?)

 

The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride

4. The Princess Bride – Samuel Goldman

Because he proves himself worthy over and over again.

 

5. The Firebrand – Susan Wiggs

Because the hero sees the heroine’s inner beauty and falls in love with it.

 

When Harry Met Sally

When Harry Met Sally

6. When Harry Met Sally – with Billy Crystal & Meg Ryan

Because husbands and wives should be best friends.

 

7. The Gift of the Magi – O. Henry

Because they gave what they valued most to make the other happy.

 

8. Catch of the Day – Kristan Higgins

Because she’s clueless Malone is in to her & he refuses to let her clean for him.

 

Brigadoon

Brigadoon

9. Brigadoon – with Gene Kelly & Cyd Charisse

Because time stops when they’re together & I love the way they dance.

 

10. Small Town Girl – LaVyrle Spencer

Because she is a story master and this old one-that-got-away tugs at my heart.

 

 

 

In Her Dreams

In Her Dreams

It’s tough to narrow down. What’s one (or two) of your top romance movies or books? Please let me know (below).

 

Then I’m hopping over to Katherine Givens, author of In Her Dreams to see her picks. Come with! She’s at

http://katherinegivens1.wordpress.com/posts/

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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from SoulMate Publishing

from SoulMate Publishing

 

 

 

If you’ve just come from J.R. Richardson, author of the fabulous Cursed be the Wicked, the lady who penned this week’s questions, welcome! If you’ve come from somewhere else, welcome, welcome! This is my stop on Romance Weekly’s author blog tour.

 

 

How often do you write?

 

images-3I want to write everyday. I don’t. I probably get to write 4-6 days a week. Sometimes it’s new words, sometimes it’s editing. If I’m in the new words phase, it varies between 200-2,000 words, depending on whether I have narrations or other demands. If I’m editing, I try to do 2-3 chapters a day. I haven’t figured out how to add up word counts during editing days. And how do you figure time done plotting? Anybody? I dream of spending 6-8 uninterrupted hours a day writing. That’s my goal – so far unattainable, but as the kids get older and my husband gets more and more supportive and understands that I need unbroken quiet, my hope grows. (Because like Elna Rae says, where hope grows, miracles blossom)

 

images-4Do you think it’s important to your craft to write as much as you can, and as often as you can?

When I write more I produce more. But I’ve gone through times when I haven’t been able to meet my word counts. I don’t want to derail myself by thinking if I don’t write as often as I can that I’m a failed writer. You only fail when you stop trying. Life will let you write more sometimes and less others. Sometimes we need to refill the well, so we don’t run dry and that’s part of the process, too.

 

 

Stephanie Gauvin  on Mt Assiniboine

Stephanie Gauvin on Mt Assiniboine

What is your opinion on the saying “if you don’t write every day, you’re not a writer”?

For me it’s similar to acting. I am definitely an actress. What I call a “career” actress, because I’ve been able to live off nothing other than acting for over 20 years. I don’t get an acting gig everyday, but I do land 3-4 of them a week. I acted and practiced the craft for several years before I could “quit my day job”. It’s the same working in any art. You must practice your craft, hone those skills, until you are marketable. I act when I’m not getting paid to act. I notice my own feelings, emotions and those of others. I observe people. A lot. Since I’m primarily a voice actor, I read out loud and “play with my instrument”. In effect, I “act” daily. This is transferable to writing. Or painting. One of my artist friends, who happens to be in Who’s Who in American Art, responds the same way whenever some one asks her, “How long did it take to do that watercolor?” “30 minutes and 30 years,” she’ll say. There’s more to writing than writing. There’s reading and thinking and observing. And social media. Can’t forget that.

 

Ok, hop with me now to Veronica Forand’s blog. She’s a multi-award winner, Veronica is. Including being a Finalist in the Daphne Du Maurier Award for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense.

http://veronicaforand.com

 

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Welcome!

Thanks to Amy Jarecki author of the Highland Force series for the invitation to land here on the Romance Weekly blog hop.

These questions are from author Jeanne McDonald, who releases The Certainty of Deception today. (Join her facebook release party—Woot! 3p.m.-11p.m.Eastern Standard)

 

How did you go about choosing the names for your characters?

 

images-2Sometimes I go on baby naming sites, like http://www.20000-names.com/ or http://www.sheknows.com/ Most of the time, however, the names just come to me along with the character. Sometimes a main character begins with one name and changes names on the third or fourth re-write. Ruby in Stolen Kiss started life as Vero (pronounced the French Canadian way- rhymes with arrow). Arabella in Stolen Heart began as Annika. But the character that developed in the story didn’t match the name and kind of insisted on switching. People I know can influence name choices. Tukie Cohen was inspired from awesome women in my town with unusual names like Twinkle, Honey and Cookie. The names of the hero and heroine in my WIP came to me very quickly. Dane and Eva. They are such opposites and so much fun!

 

Where did the inspiration for your current book come from?

7784174530_e8da0fc255_mNineteen years ago in March I was holed up in a Norwegian hutel (not a hotel) during a white out, while my husband skied the tops of the Jotunheimen mountain region. After failing the “check-out” I was unable to cross-country ski the distances to go hut-to-hut and stayed put. My newly weaned (for aforementioned trip) ten-month-old daughter (home with grandparents) and I cried about our separation. The story poured out over three days and I tucked the notes away for posterity. (19 years—that’s a generation, right?) P.S. It has nothing to do with snow.

 

What methods do you use to ensure you have no plot holes (journal, storyboard, outline, editor, etc.)?

 

Unknown-1I’m too superstitious to use a word like “ensure” regarding no plot holes, but the method I follow is three fold. The story kernel gets a page. I run this page through the Late and wonderfully generous Blake Snyder’s Save the Cat 15 Beats system. At this point, I usually spin a journal or two for my main characters, so I get to know them, their voices and their problems better. Lastly, (my most recent development) I use Lisa Miller’s Plot Safari guidelines (from the Margie Lawson school) to really develop the plot. By this time, I have a good solid 40 pages to use as a guideline. At any point during this process, I may send off notes to my incredible Critique Partner, the inimitable Sarah Hegger for eyes, Yeas, and Nays. I also have two other really talented CP’s who I hope to continue working with who tell me where I went wrong after the ms or parts of it are completed: Brenda Margriet and VC Monroe (Vicki Mixon). I’m extremely fortunate to have their input. And am open to new ideas to help keep the writing organic and fresh.

 

UnknownI am really curious to see how Regency Romance author Collette Cameron answered these questions. (especially if she reveals how she came up with the hero and heroine’s names for The Earl’s Enticement – swoon) Join me in checking her out by clicking here:

http://blueroseromance.com

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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thursdaysatcoconuts400x600Welcome!

Thanks Beth Carter for the hand-off. (Watch for her release of Thursdays at Coconuts—don’t you love this cover?—in August)

Happy you landed here. It’s the Romance Weekly blog hop where twenty plus romance authors answer the same 3 interview questions and you get insight into the (sometimes) zany minds behind the stories you love. Thanks to Tessa Gray for this week’s questions.

Do any characters you’ve written into your books remind you of yourself? Explain which ones and why?

Ruby the main character in Stolen Kiss reminds me of my inner people pleaser. Like with Ruby, people pleasing was a good coping strategy for a chaotic childhood, but in her/my twenties became the biggest roadblock article-2161071-13AABF42000005DC-283_306x341to mature (lasted longer than a couple years) love. Arabella, the heroine in Stolen Heart is a manifestation of my inner geek. Though I love sciences, I went into arts. Ara took the other direction and became a renowned shark biologist who doesn’t see how she could ever balance a long term relationship with her work. Also, something I struggled with. And Mari, the heroine of Stolen Love is my nurturer, who must draw clear boundaries (like I have to with kids, husband, expectations of others) or lose her sense of herself to love.

 

Was there a teacher or mentor in your life who helped nurture your writing?

 

Apart from the hundreds of published authors I’ve read and the tight clutch of critique partners who inspire me by letting be part of their own process? Yes. I’m learning now from Margie Lawson how to revise my images-5work using her incredible (patented) Deep EDITS method. It’s really helped the anal plotter in me have a security blanket of techniques to trim, tailor and tighten my finished product. She’s going to be at the RWA conference in San Antonio and I’m doing an Immersion class with her in October in Colorado. Can’t wait!

 

Every author has the moment when they doubt their ability to write. When that happens to you, how do you pull yourself up by the bootstraps and continue? What do you do to inspire yourself?

 

images-30Read the work of others. If it’s good writing, it inspires me to emulate. If it’s bad writing (and we’ve all know that’s out there), I’m motivated to create something better. Sometimes I take a movie or Netflix break and absorb the stories of others. Having had success as an actor helps because I really believe in transferable skills, especially when the subject matter—capturing human emotion and growth—is the same. Connection with others, with life and nature (especially water) all help build the fire and itch to plot and stitch words together.

 

661f92_ff2541fde8b1431982d0f47354f3954e.jpg_srz_156_234_85_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srzWhat fun questions! Please keep the blog hop going. Next stop, the award winning (and very loveable):

http://veronicaforand.com

 

 

(This is Veronica’s October release)

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Welcome to Kim Town. My part of the blog hop of talented romance authors responding to a weekly set of questions. This week’s questions come from The Blue Rose Romance authoress, Collette Cameron. If you haven’t done so, scoop up her latest Regency Romance The Earl’s Enticement for a great summer read!

 

How do you respond to someone calling your writing smut or demeaning your work in some other way?   I think it’s more a reflection on them than on me. They either haven’t read the genre, in which case they are pre-judging. Prejudice is a transferable trait (if one is prejudiced in one area they can be in others) so I would infer from their comment the naysayer is a person who takes shortcuts and doesn’t necessarily indulge in independent thought. If the person 4945217075_a8f47b38c5_zmattered to me in some way or another, I might attempt a debate (for example, “romance novels are modern revisions of patriarchal fairytales, plus women like sex – get over it,” – for some specific good references raid Jenny Crusie’s arsenal i.e.: http://www.jennycrusie.com/for-writers/essays/glee-and-sympathy/ she puts Nathaniel Hawthorne in his place) but more likely than not, I’d decide to keep my pearls rather than cast them.

When critiquing or beta reading, do you ever find the voice of the other author creeping into your writing? images-2Yes. But only in a phrase here or a suggestion there. And only in the early phase of a book/chapter. Usually by the time, I’ve done the number of re-writes it takes for me to be satisfied with my work, (enormous – which is part of the reason why I’m still unpublished) those phrases/suggestions have been filtered, molded and otherwise touched into my words/ideas/voice again.

What’s one quirky thing you do or must have around you while writing? imagesI don’t like to write at a desk when I’m creating or revamping. Then I must be on a couch, lounge chair, rocking chair (with feet up) or the stairs of my back balcony. But when I’m critiquing my own work, that’s when I need that flat table or desktop and hard wooden chair. (I think it harkens back to Sister Mercedes and the other nuns I try to channel from part of my childhood) To plot, I must have a crystal cat given to me wonderful authoress Sarah Hegger nearby. Kitty’s kind of a talisman.

 

 

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Next stop on the blog hop: Susan Scott Shelley, whose book Tackled By the Girl Next Door, on Wild Rose Press I can’t wait to read. It’s out in October. Isn’t her cover gorgeous? http://www.susanscottshelley.com/#!blog/c1cod

#LoveWriteChat

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images-11UnknownWelcome to the Romance Weekly blog hop! Thanks to awesome Amy Jarecki, author of Beauty and the Barbarian for the hand-off. And to the fabulous Jami Denise, author of The Queen of Hearts for this week’s questions.

 

 

When writing your novel, do you know how it’s going to end before you write, or do you write from start to finish?

heartMy process is still under construction. I cannot write more than about three chapters without having some sort of blueprint, like a plot outline. This bothers me because I’d love to be able to write organically. I admire the authors that do and their trust and total connection to the Great Whammy Dammy. I’m just not there. From my acting experience (and numerous devotions to thespian gods Sanford images-3Meisner & Uta Hagen) ‘natural’ comes about with disciplined daily practice of working with those building blocks, the voice, the body, the imagination. It’s a transferable skill and approach that I apply to writing and boils down to: concentrate on the craft. SO even though the story may change/shift (read: improve) in the process, now I always plot from start to finish before I write. It saves tears.

 

How do the people you know impact your writing? Are you influenced by friends and family for your characters?

861320_f260I draw from the people I know in two ways: 1) for coloring my characters. You know shades and slivers, texture and tone. But it’s never a portrait. Otherwise I wouldn’t have as much control over my characters. It’s more like a point of departure. Tukie Cohen, the aging hippie godmother in Stolen Kiss was originally inspired by a dear friend. The only thing they have in common now is long strawberry blonde hair and a penchant for the occult. Otherwise they are very different people. Tukie, like all characters once they’re fully formed, has a mind of her own. 2) by adding to my personal aquifer of observations of humanity. All the wonderfully diverse crazy and serious people I’ve known help me tap into believable actions and reactions.

 

Describe the hero in your current WIP in three words.

22d5cb21e98ef8b7cff533818b7848efI’m writing Stolen Heart (Gus) and editing Stolen Kiss (Matt) at the same time, so:

 

Matt Beaumont – devoted, sensual, lumberjack (he’s not a lumberjack, that’s just how the heroine sees him)

 

Augustus (Gus) MacIsaac – passionate, faithful, wounded

 

(Yes, this is a picture of Jake Gyllenhaal)

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Follow me. I’m going to check out how Veronica Forand answered these questions. This is Veronica’s first appearance on the Romance Weekly blog hop and we’re excited to have her. She just sold three romantic thrillers to Entangled Publishing and her first sweet and sexy novella, Tackled by the Girl Next Door comes out with Wild Rose Press this October (in time for football season):

http://veronicaforand.com

#LoveWriteChat

 

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images-8Ever wonder how the minds of authors tick? Welcome to Romance Weekly, the blog tour where we unscrew the watch face and let you see the inner workings. If you’ve come from Rhenna Morgan site, welcome! This week’s questions come from moi, with a little inspiration from Ryan.

 

What’s your ideal: alpha or beta and why?

RYAN-GOSLING-MEME-2In life, my first love was an alpha male and that didn’t work out so well. My first husband was a beta and that sucked too. The man I’ve been married to for 20+ years is a beta with a nice slice of alpha on the side. And I think that’s the kind of hero in fiction I’m most drawn to as well. I need that kind of rev in the girl parts a good alpha hero triggers, and the gooey marshmallow center he eventually reveals, but fervent feminist that I am, the beta has appeal that speaks to the staying power required of a happily ever after. (in my humble opinion) And apparently some people call this combo kind of guy a gamma. Others say a gamma is indifferent to the heroine (thus my reluctance to use that term) and why I prefer to call him Combo Man. Ooh. Then we’d have the A,B,C’s of heroes, right? Alpha, Beta, Combo. Purrrr.

Do you have a male buddy or mate you use for confirmation or inspiration when crafting your heroes? 80-best-ryan-gosling-hey-large-msg-136752204773

I absolutely talk to my darling husband, Edward for references on all things male. Underwear preferences. The male nipple arousal myth. All the naughty stuff. I have to keep in mind he has a very developed Yin. So not all his answers may apply. Other inspirations may come from movies, billboards, people on the street, observations. Then there’s the heroes themselves. Once they’re fully formed in my imagination. I talk to them. Ask them. What would you do Matt? Gus? Seb? And of course, they talk back. As long as no one consults the DSM IV criteria (of Mental Disorders), I’m still good.

What does any hero have to do to win your heart?

tumblr_lytzrqtBOc1r9ggz7o1_500Love the heroine. Be her rock. Be willing to humble (not humiliate) himself in front of her. Be willing to listen. Treat her right. Those are the most important things. In the not necessary, but-it’s-kind-of-like-topping-on-ice-cream category, he needs to be able to tick off one little attribute from my hero check list: he’s a good cook, OR he brings home lots of money OR he can fix anything OR he gives killer massage.

 

 

 

This was fun! Let’s hop on to Heart’s Ease series author Victoria Barbour’s site and see how she answered these questions.

http://victoriabarbour.com/blog Heart's Ease Banner

Comments make my day! ❤

#LoveWriteChat

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Blog hopping with fabulous Authors. That’s what we do here on Romance Weekly. If you’ve just come from Collette Cameron’s site, (author of The Earl’s Enticement) welcome. If you’ve popped in from fb or Twitter, welcome, welcome. This week’s questions are from Victoria Barbour, author of The Heart’s Ease series, set in breathtaking Newfoundland.

Have you always written Romance?

 

No. I started writing when I was 11. So, sci fi, adventures for girls, mysteries. In my twenties, I was a journalist. Strictly the facts ma’am. Although I was an avid reader of Romance (and multiple other genres) I didn’t really understand Romance until my thirties.  Had to build up enough life experience and sort out my own peccadilloes, I suppose. By then I grasped that Romance was more than a story about falling in love—‘cause falling in love may happen a few times in life. But it’s about how two people fall in love and problem solve together, how each inspires good in the other and how they discover not that one can’t live without the other, but that ‘my life is better with you in it than without you.”

 

How do you deal with critiques about the romance genre?

 

1992 Book Cover

1992 Book Cover

Chuckle, chuckle. I have a number of academic family members and many friends infused with cynicism borne of a life in media, so critiques abound. I refer some to a favorite Jayne Ann Krentz tome of mine, “Dangerous Men & Adventurous Women,” which features interviews and essays from writers of the genre on how Romance is the inversion of the power structure of a patriarchal society and how it celebrates the courage, strength, gentleness, and intelligence of  women and the joyous integration of both sexes. That often shuts them up. I might also add, ‘Romance novels were borne of the suffragette and women’s movement in the 19th century and celebrate one of equal right’s first freedoms: the ability to marry for love.’  Other tidbits I’ve been known to say in defence of my chosen medium: ‘No other genre consistently casts women in the main role’. ‘Romance novels feature one of the things women are fascinated with: relationship.’ ‘It’s the only genre where a woman literally brings a man to his knees.’

 

What’s the one thing about our genre you’d like people to know?

 

From The Big Bang Theory

From The Big Bang Theory

As you may be able to guess, I’m pretty good with justifying and promoting Romance when comparisons are made to other genres. To those who argue ‘Oh, but it’s so formulaic,’ I’d counter, “No more than mystery: someone dies, someone figures out who did it.” Boom. Romance novels are popular entertainment. And should be treated and admired as such. You could compare them to television series, films or popular music. Spectator sports, for that matter. (Btw: How many of us pull out a romance novel while significant other is engrossed in a game on TV?) Some romances delve into serious themes, like the TV series Heartland, some are on the lighter side, like The Big Bang Theory. They are not and never will be literature, in the same way foreign film festivals are apples to Hollywood’s oranges. To answer the question: Romance novels are valuable popular entertainment.

 

UnknownI hope you had fun. I did. And I ❤ your comments. The blog hop isn’t over! Next up: Meggan Connors who’s latest book, Highland Deception, I loved.   Check her out:

htttp://megganconnors.wordpress.com/blog/

#LoveWriteChat

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Release Date: May 30th!

Release Date: May 30th!

 

You’ve found it! My cubby in the compendium of the wonderful writers of Romance Weekly. Welcome.

 

Thanks Dani Jace for the intro! And to award winning novelist Kate Robbins, whose second Promised to the Highlander in the Highland Chiefs series is being released this Friday, asker of this week’s questions.

 

How much of yourself do you write into your characters? Or do you write characters completely opposite to you?

524013-bigthumbnailWith acting or writing, some bits of me go into all my characters. It’s my interpretation of them. How they feel, what they think, how they act–it’s filtered through me. It’s me/not me. So, kind of like drip coffee, the flavor of me, makes its way into my characters. None of which are autobiographical, if that’s what you mean. Stolen Kiss features a mechanic and a financier. Neither of them me. But their lessons? He has to learn he’s not responsible for and can’t change his brother. She has to draw firm boundaries and stand up for the right to live/lead her own life. I’ve had to do all those things. So yeah, those parts are me.  

Has your writing helped you see events in your own life clearer?

Unknown-1This question surprised me because upon reflection, the answer is yes and I thought it would be ‘negatory, good buddy.’ Not only the practice of writing, but my writing path, my road to publication— absolutely have reinforced so many life lessons. Patience, perseverance, trust, discipline, love. When contemplating and poking inside the head of another who loves or is falling in love, you remember how/why you fell in love. Writing romance (like reading it) has really helped my marriage and all my relationships.

Have you written a character with more of your personal characteristics than any other? What are they?

Photo on 2013-10-24 at 12.55Not really. I think they all are subjected to that special Kim Koffee Blend. Like the acting roles I’ve played (moms before I was a mom, a really bitter alcoholic, a murderess, a Danish queen, an Israeli Field Commander), the characters I write are separate entities unto themselves. They even talk to me and occasionally one will try to lead a coup and take over the story. (Don’t yours do that to you?) But someone’s got to be in charge. Ca, c’est moi.

 

Wasn’t this fun? Please hop on to the next blog on our tour and see how Fiona Riplee, author of The Sixxers, answered these fine questions.

http://fionariplee.com/blog

 

And don’t be shy to leave a comment. I’m not. 😀