#lovewritechat

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Hey! Romance Weekly is 6 months old today. Happy birthday to us. Were celebrating all day on our facebook page and starting today we’re taking our weekly author blog hop in a new direction. It’s fun. It’s entertaining. It’s open. And you’re invited to hop along!

 

from SoulMate Publishing

from SoulMate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

 

Thanks to Sarah Hegger, darling author of wonderful medieval The Bride Gift for the introduction.

This week’s theme is from Jo Richardson, author of Cursed be the Wicked.

 

 

My Top 10 Romances of All Time

 

Jane Eyre

Jane Eyre

1. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte

Because she refuses to be less than she is and he loves her for it.

 

2. Natural Born Charmer – Susan Elizabeth Phillips

Because she’s prickly and desperate and he falls for her purple lollipop eyes.

 

3. Faking It – Jennifer Crusie

Because he’s a con artist and she’s an art forger. (Need I say more?)

 

The Princess Bride

The Princess Bride

4. The Princess Bride – Samuel Goldman

Because he proves himself worthy over and over again.

 

5. The Firebrand – Susan Wiggs

Because the hero sees the heroine’s inner beauty and falls in love with it.

 

When Harry Met Sally

When Harry Met Sally

6. When Harry Met Sally – with Billy Crystal & Meg Ryan

Because husbands and wives should be best friends.

 

7. The Gift of the Magi – O. Henry

Because they gave what they valued most to make the other happy.

 

8. Catch of the Day – Kristan Higgins

Because she’s clueless Malone is in to her & he refuses to let her clean for him.

 

Brigadoon

Brigadoon

9. Brigadoon – with Gene Kelly & Cyd Charisse

Because time stops when they’re together & I love the way they dance.

 

10. Small Town Girl – LaVyrle Spencer

Because she is a story master and this old one-that-got-away tugs at my heart.

 

 

 

In Her Dreams

In Her Dreams

It’s tough to narrow down. What’s one (or two) of your top romance movies or books? Please let me know (below).

 

Then I’m hopping over to Katherine Givens, author of In Her Dreams to see her picks. Come with! She’s at

http://katherinegivens1.wordpress.com/posts/

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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from SoulMate Publishing

from SoulMate Publishing

 

 

 

If you’ve just come from J.R. Richardson, author of the fabulous Cursed be the Wicked, the lady who penned this week’s questions, welcome! If you’ve come from somewhere else, welcome, welcome! This is my stop on Romance Weekly’s author blog tour.

 

 

How often do you write?

 

images-3I want to write everyday. I don’t. I probably get to write 4-6 days a week. Sometimes it’s new words, sometimes it’s editing. If I’m in the new words phase, it varies between 200-2,000 words, depending on whether I have narrations or other demands. If I’m editing, I try to do 2-3 chapters a day. I haven’t figured out how to add up word counts during editing days. And how do you figure time done plotting? Anybody? I dream of spending 6-8 uninterrupted hours a day writing. That’s my goal – so far unattainable, but as the kids get older and my husband gets more and more supportive and understands that I need unbroken quiet, my hope grows. (Because like Elna Rae says, where hope grows, miracles blossom)

 

images-4Do you think it’s important to your craft to write as much as you can, and as often as you can?

When I write more I produce more. But I’ve gone through times when I haven’t been able to meet my word counts. I don’t want to derail myself by thinking if I don’t write as often as I can that I’m a failed writer. You only fail when you stop trying. Life will let you write more sometimes and less others. Sometimes we need to refill the well, so we don’t run dry and that’s part of the process, too.

 

 

Stephanie Gauvin  on Mt Assiniboine

Stephanie Gauvin on Mt Assiniboine

What is your opinion on the saying “if you don’t write every day, you’re not a writer”?

For me it’s similar to acting. I am definitely an actress. What I call a “career” actress, because I’ve been able to live off nothing other than acting for over 20 years. I don’t get an acting gig everyday, but I do land 3-4 of them a week. I acted and practiced the craft for several years before I could “quit my day job”. It’s the same working in any art. You must practice your craft, hone those skills, until you are marketable. I act when I’m not getting paid to act. I notice my own feelings, emotions and those of others. I observe people. A lot. Since I’m primarily a voice actor, I read out loud and “play with my instrument”. In effect, I “act” daily. This is transferable to writing. Or painting. One of my artist friends, who happens to be in Who’s Who in American Art, responds the same way whenever some one asks her, “How long did it take to do that watercolor?” “30 minutes and 30 years,” she’ll say. There’s more to writing than writing. There’s reading and thinking and observing. And social media. Can’t forget that.

 

Ok, hop with me now to Veronica Forand’s blog. She’s a multi-award winner, Veronica is. Including being a Finalist in the Daphne Du Maurier Award for Excellence in Mystery/Suspense.

http://veronicaforand.com

 

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Welcome!

Thanks to Amy Jarecki author of the Highland Force series for the invitation to land here on the Romance Weekly blog hop.

These questions are from author Jeanne McDonald, who releases The Certainty of Deception today. (Join her facebook release party—Woot! 3p.m.-11p.m.Eastern Standard)

 

How did you go about choosing the names for your characters?

 

images-2Sometimes I go on baby naming sites, like http://www.20000-names.com/ or http://www.sheknows.com/ Most of the time, however, the names just come to me along with the character. Sometimes a main character begins with one name and changes names on the third or fourth re-write. Ruby in Stolen Kiss started life as Vero (pronounced the French Canadian way- rhymes with arrow). Arabella in Stolen Heart began as Annika. But the character that developed in the story didn’t match the name and kind of insisted on switching. People I know can influence name choices. Tukie Cohen was inspired from awesome women in my town with unusual names like Twinkle, Honey and Cookie. The names of the hero and heroine in my WIP came to me very quickly. Dane and Eva. They are such opposites and so much fun!

 

Where did the inspiration for your current book come from?

7784174530_e8da0fc255_mNineteen years ago in March I was holed up in a Norwegian hutel (not a hotel) during a white out, while my husband skied the tops of the Jotunheimen mountain region. After failing the “check-out” I was unable to cross-country ski the distances to go hut-to-hut and stayed put. My newly weaned (for aforementioned trip) ten-month-old daughter (home with grandparents) and I cried about our separation. The story poured out over three days and I tucked the notes away for posterity. (19 years—that’s a generation, right?) P.S. It has nothing to do with snow.

 

What methods do you use to ensure you have no plot holes (journal, storyboard, outline, editor, etc.)?

 

Unknown-1I’m too superstitious to use a word like “ensure” regarding no plot holes, but the method I follow is three fold. The story kernel gets a page. I run this page through the Late and wonderfully generous Blake Snyder’s Save the Cat 15 Beats system. At this point, I usually spin a journal or two for my main characters, so I get to know them, their voices and their problems better. Lastly, (my most recent development) I use Lisa Miller’s Plot Safari guidelines (from the Margie Lawson school) to really develop the plot. By this time, I have a good solid 40 pages to use as a guideline. At any point during this process, I may send off notes to my incredible Critique Partner, the inimitable Sarah Hegger for eyes, Yeas, and Nays. I also have two other really talented CP’s who I hope to continue working with who tell me where I went wrong after the ms or parts of it are completed: Brenda Margriet and VC Monroe (Vicki Mixon). I’m extremely fortunate to have their input. And am open to new ideas to help keep the writing organic and fresh.

 

UnknownI am really curious to see how Regency Romance author Collette Cameron answered these questions. (especially if she reveals how she came up with the hero and heroine’s names for The Earl’s Enticement – swoon) Join me in checking her out by clicking here:

http://blueroseromance.com

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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thursdaysatcoconuts400x600Welcome!

Thanks Beth Carter for the hand-off. (Watch for her release of Thursdays at Coconuts—don’t you love this cover?—in August)

Happy you landed here. It’s the Romance Weekly blog hop where twenty plus romance authors answer the same 3 interview questions and you get insight into the (sometimes) zany minds behind the stories you love. Thanks to Tessa Gray for this week’s questions.

Do any characters you’ve written into your books remind you of yourself? Explain which ones and why?

Ruby the main character in Stolen Kiss reminds me of my inner people pleaser. Like with Ruby, people pleasing was a good coping strategy for a chaotic childhood, but in her/my twenties became the biggest roadblock article-2161071-13AABF42000005DC-283_306x341to mature (lasted longer than a couple years) love. Arabella, the heroine in Stolen Heart is a manifestation of my inner geek. Though I love sciences, I went into arts. Ara took the other direction and became a renowned shark biologist who doesn’t see how she could ever balance a long term relationship with her work. Also, something I struggled with. And Mari, the heroine of Stolen Love is my nurturer, who must draw clear boundaries (like I have to with kids, husband, expectations of others) or lose her sense of herself to love.

 

Was there a teacher or mentor in your life who helped nurture your writing?

 

Apart from the hundreds of published authors I’ve read and the tight clutch of critique partners who inspire me by letting be part of their own process? Yes. I’m learning now from Margie Lawson how to revise my images-5work using her incredible (patented) Deep EDITS method. It’s really helped the anal plotter in me have a security blanket of techniques to trim, tailor and tighten my finished product. She’s going to be at the RWA conference in San Antonio and I’m doing an Immersion class with her in October in Colorado. Can’t wait!

 

Every author has the moment when they doubt their ability to write. When that happens to you, how do you pull yourself up by the bootstraps and continue? What do you do to inspire yourself?

 

images-30Read the work of others. If it’s good writing, it inspires me to emulate. If it’s bad writing (and we’ve all know that’s out there), I’m motivated to create something better. Sometimes I take a movie or Netflix break and absorb the stories of others. Having had success as an actor helps because I really believe in transferable skills, especially when the subject matter—capturing human emotion and growth—is the same. Connection with others, with life and nature (especially water) all help build the fire and itch to plot and stitch words together.

 

661f92_ff2541fde8b1431982d0f47354f3954e.jpg_srz_156_234_85_22_0.50_1.20_0.00_jpg_srzWhat fun questions! Please keep the blog hop going. Next stop, the award winning (and very loveable):

http://veronicaforand.com

 

 

(This is Veronica’s October release)

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Welcome to Kim Town. My part of the blog hop of talented romance authors responding to a weekly set of questions. This week’s questions come from The Blue Rose Romance authoress, Collette Cameron. If you haven’t done so, scoop up her latest Regency Romance The Earl’s Enticement for a great summer read!

 

How do you respond to someone calling your writing smut or demeaning your work in some other way?   I think it’s more a reflection on them than on me. They either haven’t read the genre, in which case they are pre-judging. Prejudice is a transferable trait (if one is prejudiced in one area they can be in others) so I would infer from their comment the naysayer is a person who takes shortcuts and doesn’t necessarily indulge in independent thought. If the person 4945217075_a8f47b38c5_zmattered to me in some way or another, I might attempt a debate (for example, “romance novels are modern revisions of patriarchal fairytales, plus women like sex – get over it,” – for some specific good references raid Jenny Crusie’s arsenal i.e.: http://www.jennycrusie.com/for-writers/essays/glee-and-sympathy/ she puts Nathaniel Hawthorne in his place) but more likely than not, I’d decide to keep my pearls rather than cast them.

When critiquing or beta reading, do you ever find the voice of the other author creeping into your writing? images-2Yes. But only in a phrase here or a suggestion there. And only in the early phase of a book/chapter. Usually by the time, I’ve done the number of re-writes it takes for me to be satisfied with my work, (enormous – which is part of the reason why I’m still unpublished) those phrases/suggestions have been filtered, molded and otherwise touched into my words/ideas/voice again.

What’s one quirky thing you do or must have around you while writing? imagesI don’t like to write at a desk when I’m creating or revamping. Then I must be on a couch, lounge chair, rocking chair (with feet up) or the stairs of my back balcony. But when I’m critiquing my own work, that’s when I need that flat table or desktop and hard wooden chair. (I think it harkens back to Sister Mercedes and the other nuns I try to channel from part of my childhood) To plot, I must have a crystal cat given to me wonderful authoress Sarah Hegger nearby. Kitty’s kind of a talisman.

 

 

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Next stop on the blog hop: Susan Scott Shelley, whose book Tackled By the Girl Next Door, on Wild Rose Press I can’t wait to read. It’s out in October. Isn’t her cover gorgeous? http://www.susanscottshelley.com/#!blog/c1cod

#LoveWriteChat

 

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images-8Ever wonder how the minds of authors tick? Welcome to Romance Weekly, the blog tour where we unscrew the watch face and let you see the inner workings. If you’ve come from Rhenna Morgan site, welcome! This week’s questions come from moi, with a little inspiration from Ryan.

 

What’s your ideal: alpha or beta and why?

RYAN-GOSLING-MEME-2In life, my first love was an alpha male and that didn’t work out so well. My first husband was a beta and that sucked too. The man I’ve been married to for 20+ years is a beta with a nice slice of alpha on the side. And I think that’s the kind of hero in fiction I’m most drawn to as well. I need that kind of rev in the girl parts a good alpha hero triggers, and the gooey marshmallow center he eventually reveals, but fervent feminist that I am, the beta has appeal that speaks to the staying power required of a happily ever after. (in my humble opinion) And apparently some people call this combo kind of guy a gamma. Others say a gamma is indifferent to the heroine (thus my reluctance to use that term) and why I prefer to call him Combo Man. Ooh. Then we’d have the A,B,C’s of heroes, right? Alpha, Beta, Combo. Purrrr.

Do you have a male buddy or mate you use for confirmation or inspiration when crafting your heroes? 80-best-ryan-gosling-hey-large-msg-136752204773

I absolutely talk to my darling husband, Edward for references on all things male. Underwear preferences. The male nipple arousal myth. All the naughty stuff. I have to keep in mind he has a very developed Yin. So not all his answers may apply. Other inspirations may come from movies, billboards, people on the street, observations. Then there’s the heroes themselves. Once they’re fully formed in my imagination. I talk to them. Ask them. What would you do Matt? Gus? Seb? And of course, they talk back. As long as no one consults the DSM IV criteria (of Mental Disorders), I’m still good.

What does any hero have to do to win your heart?

tumblr_lytzrqtBOc1r9ggz7o1_500Love the heroine. Be her rock. Be willing to humble (not humiliate) himself in front of her. Be willing to listen. Treat her right. Those are the most important things. In the not necessary, but-it’s-kind-of-like-topping-on-ice-cream category, he needs to be able to tick off one little attribute from my hero check list: he’s a good cook, OR he brings home lots of money OR he can fix anything OR he gives killer massage.

 

 

 

This was fun! Let’s hop on to Heart’s Ease series author Victoria Barbour’s site and see how she answered these questions.

http://victoriabarbour.com/blog Heart's Ease Banner

Comments make my day! ❤

Cover Reveal for “Sweet Bea” from Chart Topping Author Sarah Hegger

Cover reveal-useSharing in the joy of someone you love and admire is delightful, sweet, and calorie free. In fact, I’m convinced it’s actually slimming. So I’m pumped and primed to introduce the Cover Reveal of dear friend and Critique Partner Sarah Hegger’s upcoming release, Sweet Bea.

Sarah’s a rising star, with her debut medieval romance The Bride Gift hovering at the top of the Amazon chart in the Ancient History Fiction and Medieval categories. Sweet Bea is the kind of book that stays with you, long after “The End.” I’m still in love with Garrett, (and I hated him at first!) and will forever see the Sweet Bea in myself and my closest female friends and family.

Without further adieu, take it away, Sarah:

Thanks for having me, Kim. Kim has the unenviable task of reading multiple drafts before they get to my publisher. And she is always so kind and supportive through it. She’s the best! But I can’t share her, because she’s mine, all mine.

And yes, Garrett is a bad, bad boy with a nasty hidden agenda. I can’t wait to show you the match up of Sweet, sweet Bea and Bad boy Garrett.

Is anything sweeter than revenge?

Sweet BeaIn a family of remarkable people, ordinary Beatrice strives to prove herself worthy. When her family is threatened with losing everything, she rushes to London to save them. Unfortunately, she chooses as her savior the very man who will see her family brought low.

Garrett has sworn vengeance on Sir Arthur of Anglesea for destroying his life when he was a boy and forcing his mother into prostitution for them to survive. He has chosen as his instrument Sir Arthur’s youngest daughter, Beatrice.

Can Beatrice’s goodness teach Garrett that love, not vengeance, is the greatest reward of all?

 

Sarah’s Bio:

Born British and raised in South Africa, Sarah Hegger suffers from an incurable case of wanderlust. Her match? A hot Canadian engineer, whose marriage proposal she accepted six short weeks after they first met. Together they’ve made homes in seven different cities across three different continents (and back again once or twice). If only it made her multilingual, but the best she can manage is idiosyncratic English, fluent Afrikaans, conversant Russian, pigeon Portuguese, even worse Zulu and enough French to get herself into trouble.

 

Unknown-3Mimicking her globe trotting adventures, Sarah’s career path began as a gainfully employed actress, drifted into public relations, settled a moment in advertising, and eventually took root in the fertile soil of her first love, writing. She also moonlights as a wife and mother.

 

She currently lives in Draper, Utah, with her teenage daughters, two Golden Retrievers and aforementioned husband. Part footloose buccaneer, part quixotic observer of life, Sarah’s restless heart is most content when reading or writing books.

I love to hear from readers and you can find me at any of the places below.

 

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Thanks so much Sarah! You can also download Sarah’s debut release, The Bride Gift on Amazon here: 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Bride-Gift-Sarah-Hegger-ebook/dp/B00KBAYOTM

#LoveWriteChat

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Blog hopping with fabulous Authors. That’s what we do here on Romance Weekly. If you’ve just come from Collette Cameron’s site, (author of The Earl’s Enticement) welcome. If you’ve popped in from fb or Twitter, welcome, welcome. This week’s questions are from Victoria Barbour, author of The Heart’s Ease series, set in breathtaking Newfoundland.

Have you always written Romance?

 

No. I started writing when I was 11. So, sci fi, adventures for girls, mysteries. In my twenties, I was a journalist. Strictly the facts ma’am. Although I was an avid reader of Romance (and multiple other genres) I didn’t really understand Romance until my thirties.  Had to build up enough life experience and sort out my own peccadilloes, I suppose. By then I grasped that Romance was more than a story about falling in love—‘cause falling in love may happen a few times in life. But it’s about how two people fall in love and problem solve together, how each inspires good in the other and how they discover not that one can’t live without the other, but that ‘my life is better with you in it than without you.”

 

How do you deal with critiques about the romance genre?

 

1992 Book Cover

1992 Book Cover

Chuckle, chuckle. I have a number of academic family members and many friends infused with cynicism borne of a life in media, so critiques abound. I refer some to a favorite Jayne Ann Krentz tome of mine, “Dangerous Men & Adventurous Women,” which features interviews and essays from writers of the genre on how Romance is the inversion of the power structure of a patriarchal society and how it celebrates the courage, strength, gentleness, and intelligence of  women and the joyous integration of both sexes. That often shuts them up. I might also add, ‘Romance novels were borne of the suffragette and women’s movement in the 19th century and celebrate one of equal right’s first freedoms: the ability to marry for love.’  Other tidbits I’ve been known to say in defence of my chosen medium: ‘No other genre consistently casts women in the main role’. ‘Romance novels feature one of the things women are fascinated with: relationship.’ ‘It’s the only genre where a woman literally brings a man to his knees.’

 

What’s the one thing about our genre you’d like people to know?

 

From The Big Bang Theory

From The Big Bang Theory

As you may be able to guess, I’m pretty good with justifying and promoting Romance when comparisons are made to other genres. To those who argue ‘Oh, but it’s so formulaic,’ I’d counter, “No more than mystery: someone dies, someone figures out who did it.” Boom. Romance novels are popular entertainment. And should be treated and admired as such. You could compare them to television series, films or popular music. Spectator sports, for that matter. (Btw: How many of us pull out a romance novel while significant other is engrossed in a game on TV?) Some romances delve into serious themes, like the TV series Heartland, some are on the lighter side, like The Big Bang Theory. They are not and never will be literature, in the same way foreign film festivals are apples to Hollywood’s oranges. To answer the question: Romance novels are valuable popular entertainment.

 

UnknownI hope you had fun. I did. And I ❤ your comments. The blog hop isn’t over! Next up: Meggan Connors who’s latest book, Highland Deception, I loved.   Check her out:

htttp://megganconnors.wordpress.com/blog/

#LoveWriteChat

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Welcome to my corner of the weekly blog hop of romance writers! Thanks to Leslie Hatchell for the intro, and the bewitching Carolyn Spear, author of Guarding His Heart for this week’s totes mcgote’s fun questions.

 

If someone could observe you writing without you knowing they were there, what strange practices might they catch you doing?

New York City Ballet

New York City Ballet

 

 

LOL! Ok. I come from an acting background, so I will often act scenes out as I write them. Sometimes this involves just my face often my voice and sometimes I will get up and move about the room as my characters. My family is used to this weirdness. Sometimes when I’m searching for a word or a lemon fresh twist on a hackneyed cliché, my fingers do the Search Ballet. Like, they’re up on either side of my ears and do this kind of flipping through my inner Rolodex. That happens a lot when I’m editing. Otherwise it’s all a lot of staring off into space, then typing madly like a whirling dervish. Stare. Type. Repeat.

 

Other than as a creative outlet, how does writing benefit you?

Zaggora Parkour Girl

Zaggora Parkour Girl

I think it helps me understand people better. Or try to, anyway. I think it’s one of the reasons we are drawn to story. We really don’t know what motivates the crazy lady in curlers down the street who does parkour on the rooftops at night. But she’s got a story. And it’s a doozy. I think it makes me more compassionate.

 

How do you feed your muse?

UnknownI don’t know if so much feeding my muse as it is keeping her on a strict diet. One that doesn’t include facebook, Twitter or long forays into a glossary of ice hockey terms, what kind of park benches line the streets of the financial district in Boston or some other nosh of research. I have to steal time from other aspects of my pretty full life to write, so when I’m in the zone, that’s where I want to stay. What does Musella actually ingest? People’s stories. Description and demeanor details. I’m pretty friendly and strike up conversations with well, everybody. The lobsterer on the ferry from Deer Island to Campobello, who’s never been on a plane, but is on an intimate relationship with the coves and bays of Maine. The Hungarian fencing Master I sat next to on a train to Toronto, who fencing-olympics-1440x900escaped certain death during the ’56 Revolution by riding out of the country on his father’s shoulders. The really sweet, incredibly wealthy receptionist at my daughter’s school, who doesn’t need to work, but wants to behave like a ‘normal’ person and get out of the house regularly. Their stories or what I infer their stories to be are part of the diet. Also: Movies and music, mythology and books. Green spaces and blue skies, water—yum, yum, crunch, crunch.

I love it when you visit! Thanks for stopping by. Comments  = ❤

from SoulMate Publishing

from SoulMate Publishing

Next on today’s Romance Weekly Blog tour, a really moving entry this week from talented Jo Richardson, author of Cursed Be the Wicked

http://jrrichardsonfics.wordpress.com/

And FREEBIE alert: don’t forget to enter the Romance Weekly GIVEAWAY guise!  Grand Prize is a 16GB Kindle Fire and 2nd prize is a $50 amazon.com gift card!  We have bundles and bundles of books to give you too, like our signed paperback bundle, our mixed romance bundle, our melody of romance and our Scottish sampler bundle!

Go to the event page for all the deets and fun games we’re playing!

https://www.facebook.com/events/773431862675366/

 

#LoveWriteChat

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images-11Welcome to my corner of the Romance Weekly writers round robin, ravens and other birds. Thanks to the very talented S.C. Mitchell, author of Son of Thunder, for the hand-off. This week’s questions come from Amy Jarecki, who releases Book 3 of the Highlander Force series, Beauty and the Barbarian this month!

 

When did you start writing, and why?

 

Anne of Green Gables, Sullivan Entertainment

Anne of Green Gables, Sullivan Entertainment

I’ve had so many first starts at writing. My first book, at tender 11 inspired by long winter nights in the countryside and the high jinks of Anne of Green Gables, but set in the 70’s. My first play, at 19 while running a children’s summer theatre. My first stab at a romance novel, at 23 challenged by a friend, and further attempts pre and post children. More recently I redoubled my efforts at writing – as an actress I have a lot of spare time and dangerously too much creative energy. Writing is another outlet for my study of the expression of human behavior and relationship.

What do you like best about writing?

cut-cushion-copyWhen it flows it’s on par with great sex, runner’s endorphins, a full fat crème brule or a woody cabernet sauvignon without complication, calories or a hangover. I’m learning to like all of the stages of producing a smokin’ finished piece. I used to hate rewrites. Now I realize rewrites are to writing what rehearsal is to acting. One of the secrets to my success as a career actress is to send love and energy into the parts of the process that trouble me. Fairy-godmother them into strengths. I soon expect to be dubbed Revision Queen. You’re invited to the coronation.

If you could go on a writing retreat, where would you go and for how long?

I’m hoping to do that this summer at my country house in the Laurentian mountains. I expect my teens and voice work will punch time holes in my concentration so it won’t be a real retreat.

Eleuthera Vacations

Eleuthera Vacations

Location of a real ‘dream retreat’ would depend on the time of year. I live in the Great White North. If it were January, it’d be the Bahamas for the winter, probably the island of Eleuthera. March or April? An English garden or a flat in Paris, 2-3 weeks. Late fall? Probably Arizona or the desert in SoCal. A month. Wherever, whenever it would include dear friend Sarah Hegger to bounce plot and characters back and forth, get me to move my butt (actually exercise) once every few days, and to supply the appropriate ‘there, there’s’ and ‘woot, woot’s’ as needed.

 

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

Speaking of the Grand Dame, Sarah Hegger is next on the blog tour. It’s an exciting week for this word wench. Her first book release, The Bride Gift happens tomorrow! (Wishing her good fortune and multiple downloads.) Please hop to her blog here:

http://sarahhegger.wordpress.com

 

Love, love, love your comments. Please feel free to leave one. xo