Sarah Hegger

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

 

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Welcome to Kim Town, my corner of the Romance Weekly blog hop. Where 20+ fabulous romance authors answer questions about what it’s like to write.Thanks to the fascinating Veronica Forand, author of Tackled By the Girl Next Door, for the intro and to Fiona Riplee, author of The Sixxers, for this week’s fun questions.

 

Does humor help or hinder you in your creative process?

Absolutely helps. Doesn’t humor help everyone, through everything? That being said, what I think is funny is not always appropriate. (Just ask my gym buddies) I love corn. (My husband has the corniest sense of humor and I just love it.) But this doesn’t always fit with my characters. In my twenties, I hung out with several comedians – including the fabulous Miss Carla Collins, (whom my daughter peed on —’nother story) pictured here—even took a nerve shattering stab at stand-up myself once. I find situational comedy relatively easy to write. Humorous internalizations are more difficult. The gems are those one line zingers that seem to effortlessly fall from the hero’s or heroine’s mouths that take so long to come up with.

 

What is a favorite go-to book or movie you use to unblock a problem in your writing?

 

Legally Blonde, MGM

Legally Blonde, MGM

This may sound really dumb, because it’s not strictly a romance and Blake Snyder call it an example of the “Fool Triumphant”, but I love to watch Legally Blonde. Something about a girl who grows and wins, who drops the loser and picks up the dreamboat, and doesn’t have to change her core beliefs and or her fluffy feminine penchant for pink and feather boas. I just find that so inspiring. Elle Woods is my favorite character study. My favorite romance movie for plot derived from character study is The Princess Bride. I LOVE William Goldman. Before Snyder, before Vogler, before Truby, before Robert Keyes, I read Goldman’s Adventures in the Screen Trade. His treatise on character derived plot still enthralls.

 

What’s the most inspiring book you’ve read this week or month that’s generated a new idea?

Unknown-1There’s two. In the non-fiction category it’s Kristen Lamb’s Rise of the Machines: Human Authors in a Digital World. I’ve spiffing up my blog site and adding new weekly features. And I credit that to Kristen’s advice. If you haven’t read her book, or heard of her, check her out. ❤ She’s awesome: http://authorkristenlamb.com/ In the fiction category, I’m going to have to say it’s friend Sarah Hegger’s forthcoming medieval Fairest Faye. I really ‘got’ her main character (and love her hero) and it helped me decide on a plot direction for the Victorian paranormal I’ve outlined. That being, fixing the B-story with strong elements of the emerging feminist movement of the 1880’s. Bang up to the elephant, wot?

 

Fun questions! Thanks for stopping by. Keep hopping. Next on the tour is my good friend Vicki Mixon, writer of romantic suspense.

http://vickimixon.com

Social Media = Friend Glue

John Lee

John Lee

 

Don’t you love that social media has changed our ability to foster friendships? I mourn all the great friendships started before everyone had a computer and a facebook account that wasted away because I was too cheap to phone or too lazy to find a stamp and walk to the mailbox.

Like Lila, my amazing roommate from University who married her high school sweetheart, went back to her hometown of Thunder Bay and became an A-1 theatre director and actress. Like TJ, another awesome roommate from early radio days in Sarnia, who became a successful producer and writer in Toronto. And like RosieMary, another flatmate who moved from Montreal to Tremblant—only two hours away—to become a ski bunny and is now a naturopath.

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Why didn’t we stay in touch? My part in it was that I suck at letter writing. Actually I suck at letter mailing. ‘Cause I’d often write the letters, but they’d never make it out of my office to the post-office. Then time would go by and I’d be embarrassed for not calling/writing/etc. which made even my crippled communication attempts whither and die. Ergo, Kim’s history of crappy maintenance of long distance friendships.

 

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

Thank Heavens for facebook and Twitter and Viber and email. Because of the convenience they offer, I don’t let that happen anymore. Tomorrow I am re-uniting with my dear friend and fellow writer, Sarah Hegger at the Romance Writers of America conference in San Antonio, Texas. When we shared the same town, we were gym buddies, community meeting partners and became fast friends in our quest to write romance novels and get published. She moved to the other side of the continent a year ago but merci to social media, this is a friend I didn’t lose touch with. In fact, we’ve only gotten tighter. Sarah is published now and as her number one fan, please forgive the blatant promotion of her Amazon chart topping medieval on the side of this blog. (It’s a damn good romance)

In other good news, Lila, and TJ and I are friends on facebook, but so much life has gone by it’s almost inappropriate to try to re-kindle the closeness we once had. Thus, the mourning. The connections I have with them now are bittersweet.

 

What about you? Does social media help you maintain friendships or do you think it makes relationships superficial? Is it a help or a hindrance?

 

Fridays: Fun Fluff & Other Stuff

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

Welcome!

It’s Friday. It’s July (my fav month) and I’m launching a new weekly feature, introducing an author friend and asking them all manner of unwriterly things.

This week it’s Sarah Hegger, author of The Bride Gift, an Amazon #1 Bestseller.

After this fun & fluffy interview, she’s going to tell you a bit about her next medieval book, Sweet Bea. She’s releasing it September 1st, but you can pre-order it right now.

 

 

Getting to Know You:

 

What did you have for breakfast? Yoplait 100 calorie Greek Yoghurt (to counter the pizza)

What are you wearing? Shorts and a tee-shirt. It’s 100 degrees out there.

When was the last time you cried? On the weekend.

What was your favorite Hallowe’en costume? A sexy witch I made for myself.

What’s the first thing you notice about the opposite sex? Arms, yum!

 

The Good/The Bad

 

UnknownFav fruit: Cherries

Fav dessert: Ice cream (Haagen Dazs), oh and baked cheesecake

Fav color: Green

Fav sport: Cricket

Fav flower: Iris

 

Jason Kelly

Jason Kelly

 

Worst habit: Drinking out of the bottle/carton

Worst movie: Last Exit to Brooklyn (great movie but so depressing I couldn’t shake it)

Worst food: Fish Blech! Yuck!

Worst alcoholic drink: Pretty much all of them

Worst vacation: Montreal at Christmas 16 years ago, freezing cold and no snow

 

This or That:

 

Soup or salad: Soup

Fame or fortune: Yes, please

New York or LA: New York

Jeans or yoga pants: Yoga Pants

Mac or PC: Mac

Twitter or facebook: Twitter

Manicure or pedicure: Pedicure

Dogs or cats: Dogs, dogs, dogs, dogs

Nightie or Pj’s: PJ’s

Coffee or tea: Coffee (when my husband makes it for me.)

 

The Really Important Things:

 

Polly C.

Polly C.

What store do you shop at the most? Nordstrom (I have a shoe thing)

If you could be any (other) nationality, what would it be? Spanish

You own a yacht. What do you call it? Amanzi (Zulu word for water)

What’s your favorite sports car? E-Type Jaguar

Do you let your sig other buy jewelry for you on their own or help them pick it out? He has great taste in jewelry.

 

More This or That (Just ‘Cause They’re So Much Fun):

 

Thanksgiving or July 4th: Thanksgiving

Morning or night: Night

Summer or winter: SUMMER!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Chocolate or vanilla: Vanilla

Print or ebook: ebook

Rock or pop music: Rock

Heels or sneakers: Heels

Europe or the Caribbean: Both

Wealth or health: Health

Fly or be invisible at will: Invisibility.

 

 

Who am I?

 

Sarah Hegger

Sarah Hegger

Born British and raised in South Africa, Sarah Hegger suffers from an incurable case of wanderlust. Her match? A hot Canadian engineer, whose marriage proposal she accepted six short weeks after they first met. Together they’ve made homes in seven different cities across three different continents (and back again once or twice). If only it made her multilingual, but the best she can manage is idiosyncratic English, fluent Afrikaans, conversant Russian, pigeon Portuguese, even worse Zulu and enough French to get herself into trouble.

Mimicking her globe trotting adventures, Sarah’s career path began as a gainfully employed actress, drifted into public relations, settled a moment in advertising, and eventually took root in the fertile soil of her first love, writing. She also moonlights as a wife and mother.

She currently lives in Draper, Utah, with her teenage daughters, two Golden Retrievers and aforementioned husband. Part footloose buccaneer, part quixotic observer of life, Sarah’s restless heart is most content when reading or writing books.

 

She loves to hear from readers and you can find her at any of the places below.

 

Website

Facebook

Twitter

 

Sweet Bea

 

Lyrical Press

Lyrical Press

Is anything sweeter than revenge?

 

In a family of remarkable people, ordinary Beatrice strives to prove herself worthy. When her family is threatened with losing everything, she rushes to London to save them. Unfortunately, she chooses as her savior the very man who will see her family brought low.

Garrett has sworn vengeance on Sir Arthur of Anglesea for destroying his life when he was a boy and forcing his mother into prostitution for them to survive. He has chosen as his instrument Sir Arthur’s youngest daughter, Beatrice.

Can Beatrice’s goodness teach Garrett that love, not vengeance, is the greatest reward of all?

 

 

Available for preorder on Amazon

 

Thanks so much Sarah. Fun getting to know the author behind the great stories. Please leave a comment below of you liked this feature.

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Welcome!

Thanks to Amy Jarecki author of the Highland Force series for the invitation to land here on the Romance Weekly blog hop.

These questions are from author Jeanne McDonald, who releases The Certainty of Deception today. (Join her facebook release party—Woot! 3p.m.-11p.m.Eastern Standard)

 

How did you go about choosing the names for your characters?

 

images-2Sometimes I go on baby naming sites, like http://www.20000-names.com/ or http://www.sheknows.com/ Most of the time, however, the names just come to me along with the character. Sometimes a main character begins with one name and changes names on the third or fourth re-write. Ruby in Stolen Kiss started life as Vero (pronounced the French Canadian way- rhymes with arrow). Arabella in Stolen Heart began as Annika. But the character that developed in the story didn’t match the name and kind of insisted on switching. People I know can influence name choices. Tukie Cohen was inspired from awesome women in my town with unusual names like Twinkle, Honey and Cookie. The names of the hero and heroine in my WIP came to me very quickly. Dane and Eva. They are such opposites and so much fun!

 

Where did the inspiration for your current book come from?

7784174530_e8da0fc255_mNineteen years ago in March I was holed up in a Norwegian hutel (not a hotel) during a white out, while my husband skied the tops of the Jotunheimen mountain region. After failing the “check-out” I was unable to cross-country ski the distances to go hut-to-hut and stayed put. My newly weaned (for aforementioned trip) ten-month-old daughter (home with grandparents) and I cried about our separation. The story poured out over three days and I tucked the notes away for posterity. (19 years—that’s a generation, right?) P.S. It has nothing to do with snow.

 

What methods do you use to ensure you have no plot holes (journal, storyboard, outline, editor, etc.)?

 

Unknown-1I’m too superstitious to use a word like “ensure” regarding no plot holes, but the method I follow is three fold. The story kernel gets a page. I run this page through the Late and wonderfully generous Blake Snyder’s Save the Cat 15 Beats system. At this point, I usually spin a journal or two for my main characters, so I get to know them, their voices and their problems better. Lastly, (my most recent development) I use Lisa Miller’s Plot Safari guidelines (from the Margie Lawson school) to really develop the plot. By this time, I have a good solid 40 pages to use as a guideline. At any point during this process, I may send off notes to my incredible Critique Partner, the inimitable Sarah Hegger for eyes, Yeas, and Nays. I also have two other really talented CP’s who I hope to continue working with who tell me where I went wrong after the ms or parts of it are completed: Brenda Margriet and VC Monroe (Vicki Mixon). I’m extremely fortunate to have their input. And am open to new ideas to help keep the writing organic and fresh.

 

UnknownI am really curious to see how Regency Romance author Collette Cameron answered these questions. (especially if she reveals how she came up with the hero and heroine’s names for The Earl’s Enticement – swoon) Join me in checking her out by clicking here:

http://blueroseromance.com

 

Romance Weekly #LoveWriteChat

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Welcome to Kim Town. My part of the blog hop of talented romance authors responding to a weekly set of questions. This week’s questions come from The Blue Rose Romance authoress, Collette Cameron. If you haven’t done so, scoop up her latest Regency Romance The Earl’s Enticement for a great summer read!

 

How do you respond to someone calling your writing smut or demeaning your work in some other way?   I think it’s more a reflection on them than on me. They either haven’t read the genre, in which case they are pre-judging. Prejudice is a transferable trait (if one is prejudiced in one area they can be in others) so I would infer from their comment the naysayer is a person who takes shortcuts and doesn’t necessarily indulge in independent thought. If the person 4945217075_a8f47b38c5_zmattered to me in some way or another, I might attempt a debate (for example, “romance novels are modern revisions of patriarchal fairytales, plus women like sex – get over it,” – for some specific good references raid Jenny Crusie’s arsenal i.e.: http://www.jennycrusie.com/for-writers/essays/glee-and-sympathy/ she puts Nathaniel Hawthorne in his place) but more likely than not, I’d decide to keep my pearls rather than cast them.

When critiquing or beta reading, do you ever find the voice of the other author creeping into your writing? images-2Yes. But only in a phrase here or a suggestion there. And only in the early phase of a book/chapter. Usually by the time, I’ve done the number of re-writes it takes for me to be satisfied with my work, (enormous – which is part of the reason why I’m still unpublished) those phrases/suggestions have been filtered, molded and otherwise touched into my words/ideas/voice again.

What’s one quirky thing you do or must have around you while writing? imagesI don’t like to write at a desk when I’m creating or revamping. Then I must be on a couch, lounge chair, rocking chair (with feet up) or the stairs of my back balcony. But when I’m critiquing my own work, that’s when I need that flat table or desktop and hard wooden chair. (I think it harkens back to Sister Mercedes and the other nuns I try to channel from part of my childhood) To plot, I must have a crystal cat given to me wonderful authoress Sarah Hegger nearby. Kitty’s kind of a talisman.

 

 

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Next stop on the blog hop: Susan Scott Shelley, whose book Tackled By the Girl Next Door, on Wild Rose Press I can’t wait to read. It’s out in October. Isn’t her cover gorgeous? http://www.susanscottshelley.com/#!blog/c1cod

Cover Reveal for “Sweet Bea” from Chart Topping Author Sarah Hegger

Cover reveal-useSharing in the joy of someone you love and admire is delightful, sweet, and calorie free. In fact, I’m convinced it’s actually slimming. So I’m pumped and primed to introduce the Cover Reveal of dear friend and Critique Partner Sarah Hegger’s upcoming release, Sweet Bea.

Sarah’s a rising star, with her debut medieval romance The Bride Gift hovering at the top of the Amazon chart in the Ancient History Fiction and Medieval categories. Sweet Bea is the kind of book that stays with you, long after “The End.” I’m still in love with Garrett, (and I hated him at first!) and will forever see the Sweet Bea in myself and my closest female friends and family.

Without further adieu, take it away, Sarah:

Thanks for having me, Kim. Kim has the unenviable task of reading multiple drafts before they get to my publisher. And she is always so kind and supportive through it. She’s the best! But I can’t share her, because she’s mine, all mine.

And yes, Garrett is a bad, bad boy with a nasty hidden agenda. I can’t wait to show you the match up of Sweet, sweet Bea and Bad boy Garrett.

Is anything sweeter than revenge?

Sweet BeaIn a family of remarkable people, ordinary Beatrice strives to prove herself worthy. When her family is threatened with losing everything, she rushes to London to save them. Unfortunately, she chooses as her savior the very man who will see her family brought low.

Garrett has sworn vengeance on Sir Arthur of Anglesea for destroying his life when he was a boy and forcing his mother into prostitution for them to survive. He has chosen as his instrument Sir Arthur’s youngest daughter, Beatrice.

Can Beatrice’s goodness teach Garrett that love, not vengeance, is the greatest reward of all?

 

Sarah’s Bio:

Born British and raised in South Africa, Sarah Hegger suffers from an incurable case of wanderlust. Her match? A hot Canadian engineer, whose marriage proposal she accepted six short weeks after they first met. Together they’ve made homes in seven different cities across three different continents (and back again once or twice). If only it made her multilingual, but the best she can manage is idiosyncratic English, fluent Afrikaans, conversant Russian, pigeon Portuguese, even worse Zulu and enough French to get herself into trouble.

 

Unknown-3Mimicking her globe trotting adventures, Sarah’s career path began as a gainfully employed actress, drifted into public relations, settled a moment in advertising, and eventually took root in the fertile soil of her first love, writing. She also moonlights as a wife and mother.

 

She currently lives in Draper, Utah, with her teenage daughters, two Golden Retrievers and aforementioned husband. Part footloose buccaneer, part quixotic observer of life, Sarah’s restless heart is most content when reading or writing books.

I love to hear from readers and you can find me at any of the places below.

 

Website

Facebook

Twitter

Thanks so much Sarah! You can also download Sarah’s debut release, The Bride Gift on Amazon here: 

http://www.amazon.com/The-Bride-Gift-Sarah-Hegger-ebook/dp/B00KBAYOTM

What Makes a Good Medieval Romance?

My dear friend and critique partner Sarah Hegger released her first book The Bride Gift this past Wednesday on Amazon. It’s an eBook through SoulMate Publishing. Here’s the url:

http://www.amazon.com/The-Bride-Gift-Sarah-Hegger-ebook/dp/B00KBAYOTM

 

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

I loved it through its various stages. Helena, her heroine is goodly fierce and Guy her hero is as steadfast a knight as ever there was. It’s not fair for me to review it, being as close to both Sarah and her product, but I was thrilled to see other reviewers give it the 5 stars on Amazon it deserves. One of the reviewers mentioned The Bride Gift was the first medieval (she) had read.

Which brought me to my lead question. (see above) Elements of a good Medieval Romance:

Well, you’ve got to have a castle.

And a girl, either in the castle wanting to get out (like Rapunzel) or on the outside, wanting to get in (like Cinderella). Although in Sarah’s story, Helena is in the castle, in charge and desperate to keep it that way.

 

And a guy (Sir Guy, in the Bride Gift) who probably prevents her from doing so in the beginning, but ends up on her side by the end. It’s always nice if he’s a knight or some sort of chivalrous fellow. Because so many of the men during those times were downright dangerous. Which brings us to the next item on the list:

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There’s got to be a villain. Preferably one who is depraved in some way (wicked, murdering Ranulf in The Bride Gift) and completely irredeemable.

 

7fcb010c66b73858ea72f2699ccab063Since it’s a historical, the facts and time period woven in should be sturdy. The backdrop for The Bride Gift is “1153, in the period dubbed ‘The Anarchy’,” when “King Stephen and Empress Maud are not the only ones embroiled in a fierce battle of the sexes.” The dressing (gowns, armor and mail) and setting (solars, castle keeps, forests and fighting fields) are all part of the enchanting backdrop.

 

Lastly, it’s the relationship between the hero and heroine, isn’t it? The hero’s got to do knightly things, like scale a tower to access his lady love (First scene, first chapter, The Bride Gift), fight off the bad guys (check) and rescue someone (not necessarily the heroine) or something (it could be a basket of kittens). The heroine must display strength and spirit (so many good possibilities in The Bride Gift, and so many spoiler alerts). And the author twines them together (willing or no—not willing in this case) showing how they are better off.

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Yes. I am biased when it comes to my author gal-pal, Sarah Hegger’s new release, The Bride Gift. I think it’s awesome. And I’m not the only one. It’s a downloadable romp worthy of your time. Check it out. And let me know if you do! 😉

#LoveWriteChat

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images-11Welcome to my corner of the Romance Weekly writers round robin, ravens and other birds. Thanks to the very talented S.C. Mitchell, author of Son of Thunder, for the hand-off. This week’s questions come from Amy Jarecki, who releases Book 3 of the Highlander Force series, Beauty and the Barbarian this month!

 

When did you start writing, and why?

 

Anne of Green Gables, Sullivan Entertainment

Anne of Green Gables, Sullivan Entertainment

I’ve had so many first starts at writing. My first book, at tender 11 inspired by long winter nights in the countryside and the high jinks of Anne of Green Gables, but set in the 70’s. My first play, at 19 while running a children’s summer theatre. My first stab at a romance novel, at 23 challenged by a friend, and further attempts pre and post children. More recently I redoubled my efforts at writing – as an actress I have a lot of spare time and dangerously too much creative energy. Writing is another outlet for my study of the expression of human behavior and relationship.

What do you like best about writing?

cut-cushion-copyWhen it flows it’s on par with great sex, runner’s endorphins, a full fat crème brule or a woody cabernet sauvignon without complication, calories or a hangover. I’m learning to like all of the stages of producing a smokin’ finished piece. I used to hate rewrites. Now I realize rewrites are to writing what rehearsal is to acting. One of the secrets to my success as a career actress is to send love and energy into the parts of the process that trouble me. Fairy-godmother them into strengths. I soon expect to be dubbed Revision Queen. You’re invited to the coronation.

If you could go on a writing retreat, where would you go and for how long?

I’m hoping to do that this summer at my country house in the Laurentian mountains. I expect my teens and voice work will punch time holes in my concentration so it won’t be a real retreat.

Eleuthera Vacations

Eleuthera Vacations

Location of a real ‘dream retreat’ would depend on the time of year. I live in the Great White North. If it were January, it’d be the Bahamas for the winter, probably the island of Eleuthera. March or April? An English garden or a flat in Paris, 2-3 weeks. Late fall? Probably Arizona or the desert in SoCal. A month. Wherever, whenever it would include dear friend Sarah Hegger to bounce plot and characters back and forth, get me to move my butt (actually exercise) once every few days, and to supply the appropriate ‘there, there’s’ and ‘woot, woot’s’ as needed.

 

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

The Bride Gift, Soul Mate Publishing

Speaking of the Grand Dame, Sarah Hegger is next on the blog tour. It’s an exciting week for this word wench. Her first book release, The Bride Gift happens tomorrow! (Wishing her good fortune and multiple downloads.) Please hop to her blog here:

http://sarahhegger.wordpress.com

 

Love, love, love your comments. Please feel free to leave one. xo

Romance Weekly # LoveWriteChat

Welcome! Thanks to LaNora Mangano for the hand-off if you’ve just come from her blog.

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This week’s questions in the Romance Weekly writer round robin come from Dani Jace, author of the steamy shapeshifter novel, “White Doe”.

 

What is the most unusual thing you’ve ever done in the name of research for a book?

images-3For my first book (White Rose – or was it White Nights? White Something anyway, named after the White Mountains, in New Hampshire – written in the ‘90’s – between an environmentalist, Zane and the environmental lawyer, Lisa who opposed him and which will never see the light of day), I hiked up Mt Washington (tallest peak in New England) because that’s what my characters were doing. It was a gruelling climb, with warm temperatures and mild breezes one day, howling winds and frozen whiteouts the next. Lisa succumbs to hypothermia and Zane revives her skin to skin in a sleeping bag. My hunky boyfriend at the time (now husband) was the inspiration for that hero.

Name a nonfiction book you’ve read for research that you wouldn’t have read otherwise.  Not including writing craft books.

images-4I’m actually reading “War and the Soul: Healing our Nation’s Veterans from PTSD” by Edward Tick. It’s an excellent treatise. Gus MacIsaac, the hero of my WIP is the only survivor of an IED that killed his buddies. Riddled with survivor guilt and PTSD, he underwent two years of therapy. At my story opening his new mission is to live life to the fullest (in honor of his fallen friends). This includes reconnecting with his childhood crush, marine biologist Arabella.

If you could travel anywhere to do research for a book, including back in time, where would you go?

images-5Although I have no book thoughts on the destination, any excuse to go to Paris or Eastern Scotland inspires me. Time-wise? Well, I have a thing about pirates. (Stop laughing Sarah Hegger!) If my safety were guaranteed, I’d love to go back to the late 18th early 19th century in New Orleans and/or Galveston and hang out with Jean Lafitte and his crew. (The proverbial ‘they’ say that along with Keith Richards, Johnny Depp’s version of Jack Sparrow was inspired by Lafitte.)

Let’s hop over to author Elizabeth Janette, who is getting rave reviews for her Texas mystery-romance Redemption for Liars

 http://www.elizabethjanette.com

 

Happy Birthday Lisa

IMG_0317My absolutely wonderful oldest daughter Lisa turns 20 years old today.

 

Isn’t she beautiful? (I agree – inside and out)

 

During my writing time this morning, this momentous occasion twigged me onto my personal need for creativity and the impact gestation of both the children and the books in my life has had on me.

 

How they’re alike:

images-1Both bring out a range of emotions from grumbling discomfort to sharp pain, from flutters of excitement to downright whoops of joy. They stir up feelings of longing, projection and fulfillment. They take up residence in my head and heart for interminable leases. I have been by turns, embarrassed and proud of their performances.

How they’re different: (Yes it’s a silly exercise, but I’ve dragged you this far so I’m going to complete it)

book-coverI’d give my life for my kids, fierce mama lion that I am. The stories? I’ll fight hard for them, but certainly not at the same level. I’ve been a television producer, a weatherwoman, one of the best in my field as a voice actor and am becoming a damn good romance writer. Each and every one of these professional chapters has been enormously fulfilling, but pales compared to the joy and satisfaction of motherhood. The stories? I can control my characters, my plot and story arc, whereas I have had limited success controlling Lisa and Jennifer, and very early realized it is better for all involved if I simply shepherd and guide them.

What do you think? Is there method to my madness or have I gone (as friend and brilliant author of The Bride Gift, Sarah Hegger might be caught saying) “bat-shit crazy”? Well, there are all those voices in my head…